Tips for Moms with ADHD

Tips for Moms with ADHD

Does this sometimes frantic morning scenario resemble your life?

  • Mom, there’s no more bread for sandwiches!
  • Where’s my permission slip to go to the zoo today?
  • Mom, Where are my clean socks?
  • Mom, did you remember to sign me up for the art class?
  • Can 3 of my friends come over after school today? And can you pick us up?
  • You keep promising we’ll get the birthday present but the party is tomorrow!
  • What’s for dinner?

Being a mom has its challenges. Continue reading “Tips for Moms with ADHD” »

A Mother’s Helper for Moms with ADHD

What is a Mother’s Helper?
For Moms with ADD/ADHD who feel stressed, disorganized, or overwhelmingly scattered, a mother’s helper can be a blessing! They can do whatever is needed while you are also at home, which may be a combination of light household tasks, spending time with children, and errands. Mother’s helpers are usually younger than a babysitter or nanny, so they don’t require as much pay. I suppose it depends on the individual, but I would think a very mature 11 or 12 year old would be the absolute youngest.  Continue reading “A Mother’s Helper for Moms with ADHD” »

For Moms with ADHD – Why it’s OK to Ask for Help

I became a widowed single mom when I had baby twins and a 3 year old. I was lucky enough to have some family and friends who were a tremendous help the first few years. But as my children grew older, it became increasingly up to me to manage everything. Whew! Talk about feeling scattered, anxious, disorganized, and overwhelmed. Thank goodness we all survived and they are in their twenties now. But just remembering those years takes my breath away.

Many women with ADHD, whether they are married or not, feel that same sense of being scattered, anxious, disorganized, and overwhelmed. Continue reading “For Moms with ADHD – Why it’s OK to Ask for Help” »

A Tip for Overwhelmed, Caring Women with ADHD

One reason many of us get so scattered and busy in our personal lives is it’s so hard to say “No.” This is especially true for caring people who are worried about hurting others or appearing selfish if they aren’t available. It’s easier if we have a “legitimate” reason for saying no – other commitments or an appointment or being sick, etc. But it gets tricky when we really just don’t want to do something. Continue reading “A Tip for Overwhelmed, Caring Women with ADHD” »